Tagged: matthew norwell

Dirty borough: Greenwich’s street sweeping boss leaves council after complaints

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Victoria Way in Charlton earlier this month: the result of half-completed council sweeps

The man in charge of Greenwich Council’s street sweeping has parted company with the authority after streets in some parts of the borough were left unswept for weeks.

Matthew Norwell, Greenwich’s director of community services, left before Christmas “by mutual agreement”, the council has confirmed.

Councillors were frustrated at the failure of his department to respond to mounting complaints about filthy streets, with some streets still covered in autumn leaves in January.

Mr Norwell, who earned £140,000 a year, also resigned his directorships at two council companies – GS Plus and Greenwich Service Solutions – on 13 December.

A council spokesperson told 853: “Matthew Norwell left the Council by mutual agreement before Christmas. We would like to wish him well with his future endeavours.”

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A council worker sweeps leaves into the gutter in Victoria Way in Charlton in January. Past sweeps had seen these piles of leaves abandoned for weeks. (The bins blocking the pavement were left out by refuse collection teams.)

Local councillors had faced the brunt of anger from residents at the deteriorating state of their streets, particularly in Plumstead and Charlton, with the service sharply criticised at a scrutiny meeting in November.

There is no recording of this meeting available, but minutes state: “There was a general perception amongst the Panel that some areas of the borough received an inferior street cleansing service in comparison to others.

“Those Members of the Panel who represented wards in the Woolwich and Plumstead areas had received numerous complaints from residents and were finding it increasingly difficult to defend the perceived lack of street cleansing in these areas.”

The minutes also record Greenwich environment cabinet member Jackie Smith saying “a discussion needed to be had” about the level of resources put into the service, with just £29 per resident spent on keeping the borough clean – much less than neighbouring Lewisham or Southwark.

However, despite the historic underfunding of the service and the failure of her department, Smith decided to blame the  Conservative Party when questioned at a council meeting in December.

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In Plumstead, Smith insisted Plumstead High Street – the focus of many residents’ complaints – had been given a “deep clean” by council staff during the summer, even though it appears that the clean failed to have any effect.

And in Charlton, residents complained of streets covered in leaves for months on end, with sweeping  – when it was carried out – seemingly carried out on an arbitrary basis, and often half-completed.

While government cutbacks are unhelpful, the council’s previous underfunding of the service left it vulnerable to failings.

The council has stepped up its act by signing up to a customised version of the FixMyStreet app, which works across many UK authorities.

But while FixMyStreet allows the council to see where there are litter and flytipping hotspots, its response to them still seems to be influenced by lobbying rather than data, with areas of Charlton being ignored despite the introduction of a “taskforce” to fix street issues.

Town hall insiders say Norwell’s department had struggled after taking on responsibility for council housing in a reorganisation designed to slim down the number of senior management posts.

While Greenwich Council has traditionally resisted suggestions that it spin off its housing stock into an arms-length company, preferring to keep direct control and hold rents down, critics say this has left much of the borough’s council housing stock in a poor state.

Norwell’s successor will take charge of a department with a huge remit – from licensing and trading standards to parks, sport and leisure and the council’s mortuary.

Whoever takes over will need to deal with the legacies of past underfunding as well as government cuts. For the sake of the whole borough – because living in an area that looks like a dump has an effect on us all, frankly – hopefully they will have the skills to turn it around.