Tagged: london cycle hire

Greenwich Council mulls setting up alternatives to ‘Boris bikes’ scheme

A prototype London Cycle Hire scheme bike, pictured in TfL’s offices at North Greenwich in 2015

Greenwich Council is considering setting up its own cycle hire schemes, after once again ruling out paying for TfL’s Santander Cycles to reach the borough.

The council has rejected a new call to work on an expansion of the London Cycle Hire network, following a petition handed to the council last month by Conservative councillor Matt Clare.

While the Labour administration does not object to the idea, it has baulked at the idea of paying the estimated £2 million cost of bringing the scheme south east.

“Boris bikes” have been a common sight in Greenwich town centre since the scheme was extended to the Isle of Dogs, with a cycle dock close to the Greenwich Foot Tunnel at Island Gardens. However, coverage is poor south of the river, with just a single hire dock east of Tower Bridge.

Now a report going to the council’s Highways Committee next week reveals that two independent hire schemes are in the pipeline as the town hall gauges demand for a scheme of its own.

An electric bike hire scheme is due to launch in east Greenwich and Greenwich town centre on 8 April as part of the City Hall-funded Low Emissions Neighbourhood (LEN) scheme. The 16-bike scheme will “encourage residents of the LEN to trial more sustainable alternatives to the private motor vehicle”.

Electric bikes would certainly work on the hilly terrain around Greenwich, Blackheath and Charlton; although plans to set up a hire scheme in the borough of Haringey – which features some punishing inclines around Highgate and Muswell Hill – have been dropped after TfL said they were poor value for money.

There are also plans being developed to make folding Brompton bicycles available at Greenwich station. Bromptons are already available at a handful of locations in London including Peckham Rye station, while there used to be a scheme at the University of Greenwich.

The report says: “Development work on the implementation of a Brompton Bike Dock is in progress. If the scheme were to progress 8 Brompton Bikes would be available at Greenwich Station. Residents would be able to hire these for just £2.50 per day with no initial sign up fee. By comparison the Santander Cycle Hire scheme costs £2 to access per day, the first 30 minutes is free and then £2 for every 30 minutes.

“Based on the outcome of these trials proposals may be developed for wider expansion of these or similar schemes to suitable locations in the Borough.”

“In the longer term, a variety of public bike sharing models are being evaluated. This includes traditional dock based models as well as ‘floating’ models that do not require substantial infrastructure to operate.”

Despite looking at different models, the report says Greenwich would still be interested in having the London Cycle Hire scheme – so long as it didn’t have to pay for it. “Officers will continue to work with TfL to ensure that TfL is aware that the Council would welcome an extension of the Mayor’s cycle hire scheme into the Royal Borough and to explore the opportunity to fund any expansion at no cost to the Council.”

With TfL facing steep financial cuts, any expansion of the loss-making scheme (it requires a £10m subsidy each year) would have to come from councils or developers, meaning its coverage of London is likely to remain somewhat lopsided. The most recent boost to the network came last year when bikes were made available in the Olympic Park, which is controlled by a City Hall agency.

While Greenwich has ruled out contributing to an expansion, Southwark Council said three years ago it would consider paying for the scheme to be extended to Bermondsey, Rotherhithe, Camberwell and Peckham, which would pave the way for a further expansion east.

But little has been heard since, and when asked last year, Sadiq Khan would only say that TfL was talking to “council planners and land developers in Rotherhithe” about expansion there.

Why no Boris bikes in Greenwich? Because nobody wants to pay for them

One cycle hire bike was based in Greenwich for a while - this unbranded prototype was spotted in the lobby of TfL's Pier Walk offices earlier this year

One bike was based in Greenwich for a while – this unbranded prototype was spotted in the lobby of TfL’s Pier Walk offices earlier this year


Back in June, this website reported Boris Johnson giving his backing for cycle hire bikes coming to Greenwich.

A few weeks back, Greenwich’s Tories decided to put a motion before the council suggesting it talk to City Hall about introducing such a scheme in Greenwich town centre, where the bikes are a regular sight. The motion was thrown out, and a bit of a daft row ensued. I’ve written about it this week for Londonist – Will Cycle Hire ever come to Greenwich?

Here’s a spoiler, though – nobody wants to pay for them. Despite Johnson promising the scheme would be self-financing, London Cycle Hire is a gigantic loss-maker. That’s not a bad thing in itself – most public transport loses money, but the wider economic and social benefits tend to be judged worth it.

There’s a good debate on whether the cycle hire scheme – still largely used by affluent men – is actually worth having. I’d argue that it is, as it frees up space on public transport and gets you fit – I used it as part of my commute for a few months last year and found it very useful.

But the main failing is that at £95 for an annual membership it’s absurdly cheap, but the £2 daily hire if you aren’t a member is worse value than taking a bus. Recent figures show that problem still hasn’t been cracked, despite changes to the pricing structure.

But it’s probably less of a priority than investing in safe facilities for people to ride their own bikes in. And that’s something Greenwich Council has been quietly doing over the past couple of years – either with TfL money or when a bit of road needs renewing. The bad old days of the Dear Leader’s tantrums are, in this arena at least, long gone.

Indeed, next year it’s likely we’ll start seeing plans emerge for the first cycle superhighway to Greenwich – phase one of CS4 from Tower Bridge Road to the Old Royal Naval College. If the scheme survives May’s change of mayor, it could revolutionise thousands of commutes. Less revolutionary is Quietway 1, a long-delayed backstreet route from Greenwich station to Waterloo, which is finally due next year.

Ignoring the logistical difficulties of getting the bikes to and from Greenwich, and the absurdity of not having any stands anywhere else in south-east London, let’s take the Greenwich Tories’ scheme at its word.

They wanted four or five cycle stands in Greenwich town centre. Lambeth paid £200,000 for 11 around Stockwell a couple of years back, so let’s say Greenwich would have to pay £100,000 for five, plus an annual £20,000 (a mayor’s booze-up) towards running costs. Good value? You decide.

See also Will Cycle Hire ever come to Greenwich? at Londonist.

Are Boris bikes finally coming to Greenwich? The mayor backs it…

London's new hire bikes feature the Dome - even though there are no terminals near North Greenwich

The Dome features on the new London Cycle Hire branding – but you can’t pick up a bike there


The prospect of London’s cycle hire scheme coming to Greenwich came a step closer this morning after mayor Boris Johnson backed a proposal to bring the scheme to the area.

While the ‘Boris bikes’ – formally Santander Cycles after a recent change in sponsor – are a regular sight in Greenwich, it is impossible to hire or dock a bike in the area.

Instead, visitors take bikes from stations close to Island Gardens and take the bikes through the Greenwich Foot Tunnel, or they cycle from docking stations closer to Tower Bridge.

The scheme has largely avoided south-east London – despite poor transport connections, particularly around Walworth, Camberwell and Bermondsey – pushing out instead to east London and more affluent parts of west and south-west London. But Greenwich’s status as a tourist destination could now help bring the scheme to the area.

Asked by Conservative Assembly member (and Tory mayoral hopeful) Andrew Boff if TfL would consider three to five stations in Greenwich, Johnson said he would back an expansion to Greenwich – with a larger number of terminals.

Presumably 45 terminals would be enough to fill the gap between Tower Bridge and Greenwich. The answer’s a surprise as TfL has appeared to have been prioritising filling in gaps in the existing area rather than expanding the service further.

Later, Boff gave credit to Greenwich Tory councillor Matt Clare – probably Woolwich Town Hall’s keenest cyclist – for coming up with the suggestion.

Boff also asked about a wider expansion towards New Cross and Lewisham, and suggested asking Network Rail for money as such a scheme would help mitigate the effect of the Thameslink works at London Bridge. We’ll find out a fuller answer to that in the coming weeks.

Could this actually happen, though? It’s likely to end up in the next mayor’s in-tray, and it’s worth noting that past expansions of the cycle hire scheme have required local boroughs to contribute £2 million each – are Greenwich, Lewisham and Southwark up for that? The bikes are largely used by tourists and more affluent commuters – but that hasn’t stopped Greenwich, which has stepped up its cycling efforts in the past year, giving funding to Thames Clippers. Other boroughs may take different views.

The level of expansion is also worth considering. The hill separating Greenwich from Blackheath could be a natural barrier (although being hilly hasn’t stopped an identical bike hire scheme taking off in Montreal), but the mayor’s involvement in redevelopment schemes in Greenwich Peninsula and Woolwich’s Royal Arsenal could see even further expansion.

Santander’s new branding includes the Millennium Dome, even though it’s impossible to hire or dock a bike there. Incidentally, Green Assembly member Darren Johnson has asked TfL to investigate a walking and cycling connection from the peninsula to Canary Wharf – a connection that would make the extension of the hire scheme to the peninsula a no-brainer.

If the hire scheme is extended, private hire operators could lose out for the visitor market – tourists can hire less cumbersome bikes from Greenwich’s Flightcentre for £4/hr, but recent changes to the hire scheme now mean Boris bikes match that price.

An expansion to Greenwich is by no means a certainty, but it’ll be interesting to watch how this plays out in the weeks and months ahead.

Oona gets on her bike – and some extra Boris bike thoughts

It’s a bit of a quiet week – apart from the sound of rain and the hammering of the roadworks outside. But thanks to Adam for alerting me to this on Twitter which made me smile – mayoral hopeful Oona King’s cycling policy, as mentioned on the Evening Standard’s Ross Lydall’s excellent blog.

There’s some sensible stuff there – creating a London bike register is a neat idea, and I’m actually surprised that cycle helmet discounts for users of Boris bikes haven’t emerged already. Opening more cycle lanes in parks is a good idea, but needs some mayoral muscle – I noticed from an earlier Standard story that Royal Parks refused permission for a docking station at The Mall, so the nearest one is currently a huge flight of steps at Waterloo Place. Hopefully by 2012 the mayoralty will be running Royal Parks and will be in a position to make this happen. In the meantime, I’m finding an hour or so pedalling one of those beasts around Hyde Park is a cheap alternative to a gym.

I imagine that the current teething problems with the Boris bikes will also need to be ironed out before any more thoughts of expansion take place – I remarked when the scheme launched that it was a bit of a journey into the unknown, and so it has proved, with their popularity with rail commuters coming as a surprise.

But here’s an odd one – taking bikes on buses? You can already take folding bikes on buses, but here’s the only London bus which has ever taken full-size bikes…

Dartford Tunnel Cycle Service bus
(Dartford Tunnel Cycle Service bus – copyright Flickr user Tom Burnham, all rights reserved.)

Ian’s Bus Stop takes us back to 1963: “They came about because of the Dartford Tunnel, opening up to connect Kent and Essex. It was expected to bring a new flood of labour benefits, with workers streaming either way through the link to new opportunities. Someone must have said “What about cyclists? They aren’t allowed through the tunnel. What will we do about them?” Anyway, a fleet of five enormous double-deck buses was designed, each capable of carrying a significant number of bikes (23) in racks on an open lower deck, with tandems and tricycles in a capacious open boot and passengers (33) upstairs.

“[They] went into service in November 1963, and ran between the Dartford and Purfleet shores largely empty. After two years the whistle was blown in October 1965. The level of actual requirement was indicated by the replacement: a Land-Rover with trailer, on call for use when summoned.”

The site adds that one of these beasts was discovered in a scrapyard by bus executive Leon Daniels and has been saved for restoration – so if Oona’s looking for a prototype… but seriously, it strikes me that bus travel and cycle travel are probably mutally exclusive, and many ordinary passengers find buggies annoying enough without having to compete with bikes as well.

A couple of other thoughts about the cycle hire scheme have struck me over the past week, though. Instead of the expense and hassle of linking the Boris bike keys with Oyster – which also suffers from a chaotic behind-the-scenes system – why not simply give annual travelcard holders free cycle hire membership? It’d be simple, and quick to implement, and would prove evidence of joined-up thinking even if the payment systems can’t be joined up immediately.

Another thing struck me on my way to a night out in Wapping. The brand new Cycle Superhighway 3 passes the brand new (ish) Shadwell railway station on the London Overground – so surely it should have a brand new Boris bike stand to go with it? Sadly, no – the nearest Boris bikes are about half a mile west of Wapping station.

Surely a small, simple extension of the hire scheme out to the new railway line – and particularly where it meets the new cycle superhighway – would be simple and much-used? Again, it’d also prove some joined-up thinking at TfL…

As far as whether the scheme will penetrate any further into south-east London than Bermondsey, the latest plans for extending the scheme include a plan to extend eastwards towards Canary Wharf and the Olympic Park. With Greenwich an Olympic borough, it’s unclear whether this includes areas south of the river. Being able to hire a bike for a run up to North Greenwich Tube might be a little way off yet.