Tagged: catford

‘Affordable’ housing on Greenwich Peninsula: The Channel 4 News investigation

Long-suffering readers will be aware that this website was the first to raise the issue of the diminishing amount of “affordable” and social housing on Greenwich Peninsula, back in April 2013. A year back, Greenwich Council lost a legal battle to keep secret the “viability assessment” council officers used to persuade councillors to increase the proportion of lucrative private housing on the peninsula.

It’s since been featured on the BBC’s Sunday Politics and on Radio 4.

Now Channel 4 News has looked into the issue, with a major investigation that’s taken some months to produce. It’s taken a broader view – revealing that just a quarter of new homes built under Boris Johnson on public land are “affordable”. As well as Knight Dragon’s Greenwich Peninsula, it also features Barratt’s Catford Green development (Catford dog track to the rest of us).

Shane Brownie, who took on Greenwich Council and features in the report, has also written about his experiences.

One thing missing from Channel 4’s investigation is the role of Greenwich Council in this – Labour assembly member Nicky Gavron criticises the actions of the Tory mayor, but isn’t quizzed about why one of her own councils allowed the Peninsula’s developers to railroad it into changing the housing mix there so it could grab £50 million in government grants. But otherwise, it’s a revelatory – and depressing – look at an under-reported aspect of London’s housing crisis.

Bakerloo brush-off for Catford: Tube to Lewisham ‘set for 2030’

Waterloo Tube station
This has been kicking around for a few days, but as this website’s gong through a bit of an infrastructure phase, it’d be daft to ignore it – Transport for London’s commissioner has said the Bakerloo Line could be extended to Lewisham by 2030, running via the Old Kent Road and New Cross Gate. (See original London SE1 story and page 38 of the TfL commissioner’s report.)

But Mike Brown’s preferred plan is to build only a first phase to Lewisham – instead of extending the route over National Rail lines through Catford to Hayes.

Bakerloo Line proposals/ TfLIt’s mixed news for Lewisham Council’s campaign to bring the Tube to the borough, as while Lewisham itself – undergoing rapid redevelopment – would get a much-needed Underground link, its southern neighbour faces being stuck with inferior overground services, despite also being home to big regeneration schemes.

On first sight, it appears a remarkably short-sighted proposal. If you consider how congested North Greenwich is now, a Bakerloo terminal at Lewisham – attracting passengers from all points south and east – could make that look calm and peaceful.

Furthermore, the really big costs would be in tunnelling to Lewisham – converting the old Mid-Kent rail route through Ladywell, Catford Bridge, Lower Sydenham and out to Hayes would be relatively cheap.

(Readers with very long memories will remember we’ve been here before – the original 1965 Jubilee Line (then Fleet Line) proposals would have seen the line extended in phases to run to Hayes by 1980.)

But as mentioned last year, Bromley Council has long been unhappy about losing direct trains to the City from Hayes – even though the Bakerloo can shift far more people, and is likely to be at least as quick for suburban travellers than existing services.

If Bromley’s rather inexplicable opposition continues, it’ll also remove one of the key benefits of the scheme – freeing up extra National Rail routes through Lewisham after the Hayes line is transferred to the Underground.

Of course, this does open up the opportunity for others to belatedly come in – last year the Eltham Labour Party agreed a motion backing a Bakerloo extension along the Bexleyheath line, a slightly more sensible proposal than the DLR on stilts on top of the A2.

Lewisham Council studied a variety of different options in a report five years ago, but its findings were largely ignored this side of the border. More recently, Greenwich Council has lent its backing to a Lewisham extension. Local Tories are also supporting the idea.

Bakerloo campaigners will now look at persuading London’s next mayor to look afresh at the scheme so he/she opts to implement the whole extension, rather than just a link to Lewisham. But with TfL losing all its government grant from 2019, the future of the whole scheme isn’t fully guaranteed yet.

17 December update: TfL has now published its full report into the Bakerloo line extension, confirming the above – and indicating that a route through Catford has not so much been kicked into the long grass, but booted into the pond, but also opens up the possibility of a route through Eltham and Bexleyheath to Slade Green. “Planning and engineering work for options to Lewisham will be undertaken on the basis of avoiding preclusion of a future onwards extension including to Hayes and potential other locations such as towards Bexleyheath. This will include working with stakeholders to safeguard necessary delivery of the infrastructure that may be required.”

City Hall’s new website reveals an alternative map of London

Alternative Tube maps are objects of fascination for many – but now the mayor’s office has got in on the act with an alternative map of London itself.

GLA website

The new Greater London Authority website features a map that invites you to “find out what we’re doing where you live and work”. You’re invited to select a borough from a dropdown, then you’re presented with some blurb about that borough and a map of neighbourhoods.

GLA website

So here’s Greenwich… with a photo of a building site. And a blurb that’s rather similar to the Royal Borough of Greenwich Wikipedia entry.

GLA website

And here’s the map. Charlton seems to encroach a bit far west and Hither Green seems to be making a bid to escape the borough of Lewisham, where it wholly belongs. But hold on… what’s that in the top right-hand corner where Thamesmead should be? Creekmouth? Wrong side of the Thames…

GLA website

And that’s not Erith and Thamesmead MP Teresa Pearce. (Thanks to Teresa herself for identifying the photo as being of the Conservative MP for Twickenham, Tania Mathias.)

GLA website

Let’s switch over to Lewisham, where the blurb also seems to have been lifted from Wikipedia.

GLA website

Where’s Catford gone? It appears to have been almost wholly replaced by Ladywell (yet is being represented by Catford South’s councillorsone of them isn’t impressed).

GLA website

Here’s Bexley. Who says they live in “Blackfen Lamorbey”? (Blackfen & Lamorbey is a Bexley Council ward covering Blackfen and the western end of Sidcup.)

GLA website

Here’s Bromley, where Chislehurst has vanished. Horns Green, a hamlet on the Kent border consisting of a few houses, gets an entry. And what’s “Woodlands?”.

GLA website

Tower Hamlets. Poplar Riverside? (It’s a development zone.)

GLA website

Over in Camden, Camden Town and Kentish Town have been swallowed up by an expanding Gospel Oak.

GLA website

Here’s my favourite – someone clearly stuck Ewell in before realising it’s actually in Surrey, not in Sutton, and so nothing to do with the mayor.

What’s happened here, then? It looks like an odd mix of reality combined with Wikipedia searching, council wards and the wishful thinking of developers and estate agents.

It must have been a good idea at the time to try to map London’s hundreds of neighbourhoods, and present some interesting data to go with them – but it’s actually harder than you think.

Lewisham bags a Bakerloo boost – but beware a backlash

It’s a relief to be able to write about some unalloyed good news – Transport for London is consulting on extending the Bakerloo Line to Lewisham, Catford and Hayes.

Bakerloo Line proposals/ TfLSure, the extension might be at least a decade and a half away, and plans for a Tube to Lewisham have been kicking around since the 1940s, but it’s welcome to see proposals being dusted down – hopefully it’s for real this time.

Two routes from the Elephant to Lewisham are on offer – one via the Old Kent Road, with heaps of sites awaiting redevelopment (and designated a mayoral “opportunity area“); and another via Camberwell and Peckham Rye, where existing services are heaving.

Whichever route is chosen, the line will then pass through New Cross Gate and down to Lewisham before taking over the existing National Rail service from Ladywell to Hayes. That’s an indication of just how old this scheme is – many of the big Tube expansions of the 1930s and 1940s came about by taking over mainline services. But it would free up some space at the awkward rail junction at Lewisham, as well as creating more room for services on the main line to Kent.

There’s also an option for the line to run to Beckenham Junction and possibly through new tunnels to Bromley.

Lewisham Council has been quietly pushing the case for a Bakerloo Line extension for some time – a 2010 report for the council even mulled over an extension through Blackheath to Bexleyheath and Dartford. Think of the benefits that could bring to Kidbrooke Village…

But what’s on the table now could transform much of the borough of Lewisham. That said, here are two blots on the beautiful Bakerloo landscape that supporters will need to watch out for.

Firstly, Labour MPs. Seriously. Despite the fact that the extension’s being heavily promoted by Lewisham Labour Party, up popped Streatham MP Chuka Umanna and Dulwich MP Tessa Jowell a couple of weeks ago, briefing the Evening Standard that “a growing population of younger people would be served if the line goes further west instead — to Camberwell, Herne Hill and Streatham”. In other words, “screw you, Lewisham”. Rather unfortunate, but Umanna has form – he came out with the same cobblers five years ago. You’d think London mayoral wannabe Tessa Jowell would know better, mind.

Secondly, Bromley Council. This website understands the Tory authority’s been reluctant to take part in talks to push the extension. It’s possible Bromley’s worried about losing the National Rail link from Hayes – many weekday trains run fast from Ladywell to London Bridge, providing a relatively speedy link into town. Bromley’s support would be vital for the line progressing beyond Lewisham – will the chance of a further extension sway them?

So there’s plenty to play for. I suspect the Old Kent Road option will come out on top – which will be harsh on Camberwell, first promised a Bakerloo extension in 1931. But it’s all about the “opportunity areas”, which is why a link to Bromley is mooted rather than, say, extending the line a couple of miles slightly further to isolated New Addington.

Consultation papers also indicate that an extension of London Overground services from New Cross is also being considered, although papers presented to Lewisham on Monday indicate that this could be a link to Bromley rather than to Kidbrooke. If Greenwich councillors want to see Kidbrooke and Eltham better connected, they should speak up now. And if you want to see south-east London better connected, then you should speak up now too.

Quiz Boris Johnson on Silvertown Tunnel (or Lewisham Hospital)

A quick heads up – if you want to quiz Boris Johnson on why he wants to pollute half of Greenwich and beyond with his new Silvertown Tunnel, or why he’s refusing to support the campaign to save Lewisham Hospital’s accident and emergency service, then he’s doing a public Q&A at the Broadway Theatre in Catford (or “Catford, Lewisham” as City Hall calls it) a month today, on Thursday 7 March. Apply for a seat via the City Hall website.

‘Have you tried your local bike shop?’

A few weeks ago I had a minor, but irritating problem with my bike – a puncture. I’m not much cop yet at the whole palaver of getting wheels and tyres off, so I looked at ways to save myself a bit of bother. My eureka! moment came when I remembered there’s a Halfords only about half a mile away from me, in Charlton’s Stone Lake Retail Park.

So I took the bike down, and the young guy said it’d be fine… until he realised they didn’t have my size of tube in stock.

“Have you tried your local bike shop?” he asked.

You are my local bike shop, I replied.

And off I trudged. Eventually, I killed several birds with one stone by taking it into The Bike Shop on Lee High Road, Lewisham for a full service.

My bike came back as as good as new with a few parts replaced, and the advice that I should consider getting my tyre changed in a month or two as it was wearing out. Unfortunately, that should have been “in a day or two” – it barely lasted 36 hours. But The Bike Shop happily put things right for me without complaint, and I’ve been riding happily ever since.

There’s a couple of nearer places – the venerable Harry Perry Cycles in Woolwich, and Cycle Warehouse in Greenwich, both of which have given me friendly service in the past, and Cycles UK in Deptford is probably a similar distance away.

But the geography of this bit of London means it’s simpler and more pleasant to ride to/from Lee High Road – a zip through Blackheath Village or a meander through the Cator Estate (although I blame a pothole there for my service being a bit costlier than I planned for) instead of the dual carriageways or steep hills of my immediate neighbourhood.

The Bike Shop’s staff have been pretty good to me in the past, and I get a London Cycling Campaign member discount. So I’ve adopted them to get bits and bobs, although hauling a stricken bike from Charlton for fixing is awkward, as I’ve discovered.

Even though I’ve been cycling for year now, bike shops still have an amazing capacity to both baffle and fascinate me in equal measure – I wish I’d visited Deptford’s famous Whitcomb Cycles before it moved, but the nearby Union Cycle Works co-operative will still build you one if you want.

But, fellow cycling reader, is there any other local bike shop I should be aware of? I also know of Compton in Catford and the Sidcup Cycle Centre, and I’ve heard Brockley Bikes are very highly regarded. Any tips, or any experiences of the shops I’ve mentioned you can share,

Could Greenwich get a cycle marathon?

Remember when the Tour de France came to town nearly four years ago? According to the Evening Standard, a cycle race through London could become a regular event, if Boris Johnson has his way…

Boris Johnson is planning to emulate the success of the London Marathon by staging the world’s largest timed bike race in the capital.

Up to 30,000 amateur riders would take to the streets in what the Mayor has billed as the “London Marathon on Wheels”, scheduled for 2013

The plan’s based on the Cape Argus/ Pick and Pay tour in South Africa, a 109km race around Cape Town which attracts 31,000 riders each year. It’d follow in the tracks of next year’s Olympic road race, which starts at the Mall and runs out to Box Hill in Surrey and back again.

Of the four routes under consideration, according to the Standard, one would start at Greenwich and head out into Kent, as the Tour de France did, before heading back into London. Another could use the North and South Circular Roads, potentially meaning a route through Woolwich, Eltham and Catford. Other routes would follow the Olympic course, as well as one from the Olympic Park out to Essex.

It’s an exciting possibility, but also very typically Boris – going for the big publicity around cycling, but neglecting run-of-the-mill cycling infrastructure. Hopefully if this goes ahead, and a SE London route gets picked, the Standard won’t rubbish it like it did with the marathon a couple of years ago.

Greenwich is, of course, already a proud host of the London Marathon (a few moaners aside) – which is just a week and a bit away – although has a less easy relationship with the gimmicky Run To The Beat half-marathon, imposed on the area a few years ago with little consultation. (And did you know Race For Life is coming to the peninsula next month, as well as to Blackheath?) Can we make room for another big, fun, sporting event?

Bring it on, I say. But where would be a good route? It’d be no good for crowds, but a huge peleton of cyclists taking over the Blackwall Tunnel approach road would be worth seeing…