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news, views and issues around Greenwich, Charlton, Blackheath and Woolwich, south-east London – what you won't read in Greenwich Time

Beyond the Silvertown Tunnel: TfL eyes Ringway road revival

with 9 comments

With smog levels high in London this week, you might think that anyone proposing major new road schemes for the capital would be laughed out of town.

But Transport for London is considering reviving long-dead proposals for new orbital roads around the capital – raising the spectre of decades-old plans which threatened Blackheath Village and other parts of SE London.

The transport authority is already planning a new road tunnel under the Thames to feed into the A102 at the Greenwich Peninsula. But the plans don’t stop with the Silvertown Tunnel or possible plans for a bridge at Gallions Reach, near Thamesmead.

City Hall is currently consulting on proposals to change the capital’s planning guidance, The London Plan. These include taking on board the recommendations of the Roads Task Force as planning policy.

London Plan alterations

The Roads Task Force was set up in 2012, after Boris Johnson’s second election win “to tackle the challenges facing London’s streets and roads”. Dubbed an independent body, it includes representatives of haulage, transport and motoring groups as well as the London Cycling Campaign and Living Streets. Its first report was published last summer, and recommended a “feasibility study of tunnelling to remove ‘strategic’ traffic from surface and free-up space for other uses”.

This month, a progress report has appeared, where this has become…

RTF March 2014 report

TfL’s enthusiasm for digging tunnels hasn’t just been sparked by Silvertown – Boris Johnson is backing proposals by Hammersmith & Fulham Council to build a Hammersmith Flyunder, which would replace the existing flyover.

While the plan’s being sold on revitalising Hammersmith town centre, options being pushed by the council involve effectively creating a buried urban motorway from Chiswick to Kensington.

So what’s meant by the “orbital tunnel”?

As both the Silvertown Tunnel and Gallions Reach/ Thames Gateway Bridge are, essentially, revived versions of long-dead transport plans, this could well mean the resurrection of Ringway 1.

Ringway 1

Here’s the leaflet which sold the Blackwall Tunnel Southern Approach to locals when construction started in 1967. (Thanks to The Greenwich Phantom for the scans.) The BTSA was originally planned to be part of Ringway 1, which would have featured an interchange at Kidbrooke, roughly where the current A2 junction is now.

A new road, the South Cross Route, would have continued at Kidbrooke, following the railway line and ploughing through the Blackheath Cator Estate and tunnelling under Blackheath Village, through Lewisham town centre and featuring an interchange roughly where St John’s station is for a slip road to New Cross. It would then have follow the railway line through Brockley, Nunhead and Peckham and on a flyover through Brixton, where the famous “Barrier Block” of flats was built in anticipation of a motorway which, thankfully, never came.

The Ringways project would have been Britain’s biggest ever construction project. They were proposed by Conservative politicians on the Greater London Council and tacitly backed by Labour opponents – sound familiar? The GLC also planned Ringway 2 – which threatened Oxleas Woods, and still does today in the form of the Gallions Reach Bridge proposal.

But the Ringways caused such public outrage that they never happened. It led to an upsurge in local activism, such as this community group in Grove Park, channelled through the Homes Before Roads group. The Tory GLC considered burying the roads to pacify locals. But when Labour won the 1973 GLC election, it scrapped the Ringways – public protest and oil price hikes were too much.

But now the plans are back. In January, Transport for London’s managing director of planning, Michele Dix, gave a presentation to the Institution of Engineering and Technology. She discussed TfL’s plans to extend tolling on London’s roads, and how this may be applied to the Blackwall Tunnel and Silvertown Tunnel (if built).

Whereas the proceeds from Ken Livingstone’s congestion charge went into public transport, these new TfL tolls would pay for… more roads. Which could include, she said, orbital tunnels.

Michele Dix TfL presentation

Looks familiar, doesn’t it?

Ringways compared with orbital tunnel

Essentially, TfL is looking at using the A102 through Greenwich, Charlton and Blackheath – and a Silvertown Tunnel – as part of a resurrected Ringway. And areas such as Blackheath, Lee, Lewisham, Brockley and Catford would be in the firing line for a tunnel.

Even if we bury the damn thing, the traffic has to come off the roads somewhere – and London simply can’t cope with the number of vehicles as it is. Any more would be a disaster. Why a road? Why not an orbital rail line?

New roads fill up as soon as they’re built. The last major road to be built in London, the A12 through Leytonstone, is the UK’s ninth most congested road, 15 years after it opened.

This is why opposing the Silvertown Tunnel is so important. It’s the thin end of a very dirty wedge. And it’s why Greenwich Council’s decision to endorse an Ikea next to the Blackwall Tunnel approach is so dangerous – because the last thing we need is extra traffic, even on grounds of congestion alone.

But it’s on health grounds where this also counts. Paris is also suffering from high pollution at the moment, so is making public transport free to all this weekend. London’s politicians, led by its mayor along with its footsoldiers like Greenwich’s councillors, just seem to want to encourage even more people to get in their cars. Choked, congested and polluted – is this really the sort of city we want to live in?

(I’m indebted to Steve Chambers, who’s researching Homes Before Roads and the Ringways plan, and Tom Barry, who’s been posting about the Hammersmith plans at Boriswatch.)

Written by Darryl

14 March, 2014 at 12:19 pm

9 Responses

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  1. As I’m reading this, my phone is pinging through air pollution alerts thanks to the London Air app. I know it’s a bad day anyway, as I can taste the dirty air when I’m outside.

    I look out the train window and see London veiled in smog. I would cycle into town, but I’m not today because of the pollution. I worry about my son who is in primary school, and will probably be playing outside in the filthy air right now.

    Who in the right mind would think it was a good idea to have more roads, more traffic, more pollution, more avoidable deaths?

    methers

    14 March, 2014 at 1:13 pm

  2. I’ve just had a look at londonair.org.uk, the pollution in our borough is dreadful, they council/mayor really need to do something about it before all this talk of more roads.

    Tina

    14 March, 2014 at 2:56 pm

  3. http://t.co/zQC0dGnDqF has some history of the ringways (that’s a link to Ringway 2) – basically Ringway 1 is north of the existing S circular road, Ringway 2 is south of it. Boris also seems to have the bonkers idea of burying the S Circular. And here’s the residential street earmarked for Ringway 2: http://www.flickr.com/photos/clogsilk/10819056784/

    clogsilk

    14 March, 2014 at 3:12 pm

  4. Can’t remember who said it, but this struck me as appropriate:

    “Adding lanes to solve traffic congestion is like loosening your belt to solve obesity.”

    bikemapper

    14 March, 2014 at 3:38 pm

  5. The Evening Standard’s report on last summer’s Roads Taskforce plan http://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/south-circular-goes-underground-and-brent-cross-to-get-flyunder-in-30bn-plan-8697628.html. The bit about making the South Circular feel more residential is comical – has the reporter ever driven on it? It’s mostly residential already!

    clogsilk

    16 March, 2014 at 8:29 am

  6. Short piece by Dave Hill at The Guardian how London was “spared the ringway road” once before.

    http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/davehillblog/2014/mar/16/london-ringways-road-plan-jay-foreman?CMP=twt_fd

    (sorry, couldn’t snip the url as snipurl said it was spam!)

    Chris Taylor

    16 March, 2014 at 7:16 pm

  7. That must have taken Dave Hill a good minute to throw together…

    clogsilk

    16 March, 2014 at 10:14 pm

  8. I love what “bikemapper” quoted— “Adding lanes to solve traffic congestion is like loosening your belt to solve obesity”. It perfectly encapsulates the idea behind this addition of more roads and the cause of greater air pollution in London.

    So many people outside of London see the country in such rose-colored glasses, oblivious to the growing amount of pollution here. I do believe we’ll have to warn immigrants of this situation, especially those intending to bring their families here or raise children in the city. On the other hand, these people often come from more polluted areas which is why this seems like no big deal to them. Nevertheless, I agree that it’s highly essential for us to oppose this plan.

    Thanks for helping bring this matter to the attention of the public.

    Jamie

    25 March, 2014 at 12:44 pm

  9. The A12 link is congested ’cause it wasn’t built to the original spec. The M11 was intended to head straight for Ringway 1 where the A12 meets it today. Had all the ringways and arterial roads been built as planned there wouldn’t be as many traffic problems as some seem to think.

    paspie

    18 August, 2014 at 1:12 am


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