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news, views and issues around Greenwich, Charlton, Blackheath and Woolwich, south-east London – what you won't read in Greenwich Time

Discover Greenwich and the Old Brewery – it’s smashing

with 14 comments

Discover Greenwich

If you’re in Greenwich town centre tonight, keep an eye out for a familiar blond mop, as Mayor Boris rocks up to tonight’s launch of the spanking new Discover Greenwich visitor centre. The £6m centre is Greenwich’s first proper attempt at a place that’ll welcome tourists and attempt to explain just why they’ve the place they’ve found themselves in is known around the world. Previous efforts have just been small tourist information offices – this is the real deal.

Discover Greenwich

The Old Brewery - smash!The best thing for us locals, though, is that from tomorrow the Greenwich Union’s new sister venue, The Old Brewery, opens alongside Discover Greenwich. More cafe/restaurant than pub, it’s already brewing its own beers alongside Meantime’s other tipples.

That’s where today’s press preview got off to a dramatic start – as a glass food counter on the bar suddenly collapsed and smashed as hungry hacks were swarming around for croissants. Thankfully, nobody was injured, although a few morning pastries did bite the dust. Good to get something like that out of the way before you open the doors to the public!

Discover Greenwich

Discover Greenwich’s aim is admirable – to bring together information on Greenwich’s various sites, although with the emphasis on the royal connections with the Naval College, and the National Maritime Museum. It does a very good job of it – much of Greenwich’s history has only really been available in dusty history tomes, or delivered in slightly embarassing reconstructions for the benefit of Americans.

Discover Greenwich

But here it comes alive – from the reconstruction of a window at the Tudor Greenwich Palace, to the recreation of the accommodation on offer to seamen at the old Greenwich Hospital. Recent excavation on the Naval College site has informed and embellished the collection of items on show, while displays put the old royal town into a modern context. One display explains the architectural influence of Wren and Hawksmoor across London, another compares Greenwich with similar World Heritage Sites across the globe.

Discover Greenwich

More recent developments in Greenwich are marked with displays and videos from 20th century Naval College events and a model of JASON, the reactor which punched a hole in Greenwich Council’s 1980s nuclear-free zone. A display about industrial Greenwich is a little easy to miss – unless I’m mistaken, it doesn’t mention the gas works, which seems a huge omission, but you can use a touch-screen map to track where the bombs fell in Greenwich borough in World War II. Both my current house in Charlton and my old one in Greenwich sustained minor damage, I discovered.

Discover Greenwich

Upstairs might just be Discover Greenwich’s real gem – the Clore Learning Centre, where there’ll be courses held for both adults and children. For local kids, it’ll be a great opportunity to bring them closer to the area’s heritage – my school career contained one solitary early-1980s trip to the National Maritime Museum, which I remember more for my teacher giving us all personalised notebooks he’d made himself than anything we learned that day. (Captain Cook and scurvy. That was it.) Adults can get courses and lectures in local history, archaelogy, photography, and beer tasting. Yes. BEER.

The Old Brewery

Back to the Old Brewery for an 11am sip of Meantime’s Hospital Porter. It’s smooth, smoky, and incredibly drinkable for an 8% brew. Meantime founder Alistair Hook spoke of his sadness that London’s brewing history – once “the world’s greatest brewing city” – was now being neglected with breweries closing. The Old Brewery corrects some of this – wonderful wall displays tell the history of the capital’s beer, pubs and brewing. A tiny photo on the wall shows what’s now the Greenwich Union and its neighbour, the Tolly (Richard I) – the two bars separated by the Tolly’s then off-licence. It looks like it’s from another era. In fact, it’s from 1972.

The Old Brewery

The venture also gives Meantime the chance to experiment with old brews – Hospital Porter is a recreation of a style familiar to the old sailors who lived at Greenwich Hospital. Just as enticing is Kellerbier – a lager brewed in the cellar. We’re three weeks or so away from a taste of this – interestingly, it’ll be dispensed without extra gas, which could make it palatable to the strict Campaign for Real Ale types. It’ll be interesting to see what they make of it.

The Old Brewery cellar

I’ve mentioned before how many locals have an ambivalent relationship with Greenwich as a tourist attraction, but Discover Greenwich goes a long way to bridging that gap. As a primer on just why it became such a favourite of royalty, and how it stayed that way, it’s wonderful. It could do with some more on Greenwich’s other aspects, but perhaps that’s a challenge for others to take up. And I think I’ll be back to the Old Brewery for some Hospital Porter very soon…

Discover Greenwich

Written by Darryl

22 March, 2010 at 3:29 pm

14 Responses

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  1. Splendid review, Darryl. I have to wait until at least the weekend to see it for myself, but at least I know there’s something worth waiting for.

    TGP

    22 March, 2010 at 3:42 pm

  2. I was at one point going down and talking to them about industrial Greenwich – I hope they took some of what we said in. The mega gas works on the Peninsula was quite late of course, but there were two earlier ones – which I bet they ignore. I just hope they have managed to fit in some of the telecommunications stuff – and marine engine building, of course.
    They were also making some ‘we are very interested’ noises about the bits of the medieval tide mill – does that feature at all?
    I have rather decided not to go to the opening tonight so I shall prepare to be annoyed/pleased tomorrow or Wednesday.
    We actually had a GLIAS visit to Jason at some time in the 1980s – frankly, I’ve seen more interesting bits of concrete.

    Mary

    22 March, 2010 at 4:06 pm

  3. It looks fascinating and well worth a visit – thanks for the write-up and the great photographs.

    Raven

    22 March, 2010 at 4:36 pm

  4. Really looking forward to checking out the beer, the history and most importantly the beer.

    Emma

    22 March, 2010 at 6:23 pm

  5. Their website doesn’t give the opening hours, just says it’s opening tomorrow. Any idea?

    Steve

    22 March, 2010 at 8:30 pm

  6. Good stuff. I look forward to having a look around it all when I’m next back on the old manor.

    Brian

    22 March, 2010 at 11:06 pm

  7. Great photos- I was really impressed by it at the launch party last night. Didn’t have time for a thorough look around, but will be back to have a proper visit soon. I particularly love the section about the old Tudor chapel, the remnants of which were found under the car-park a couple of years ago. It’s a shame it was too fragile to be left exposed (even under glass), but the recreation gives people a proper sense that this was the actual site on which so much history took place. Marvellous.

    Nigel Fletcher (Cllr)

    23 March, 2010 at 10:51 am

  8. Glad you liked the new Clore Learning Centre Daryl. We (Greenwich Community College) are running a range of courses for Adults at the centre including the Beer Appreciation Masterclass. Full details are at the link below if you are interested.

    http://static.gccweb.co.uk/documents/cC42TmU7/ornc-courses-2010.pdf

  9. Picked up a copy of the restaurant menu yesterday, looks good. Looking forward to trying it out.

    I wonder what kind of homework the GCC sets for its Beer Appreciation Masterclass…. :-)

    Deptford dame

    23 March, 2010 at 12:42 pm

  10. hope to join you for a pint of that hospital porter one day (7th May?!)

    adrian

    23 March, 2010 at 9:32 pm

  11. I hope they do have something about industrial Greenwich – it is an interesting story – and I recommend ‘Greenwich Marsh – The 300 years before the Dome’ and ‘Greenwich & Woolwich at Work’, both by Mary Mills

    There are a few glimpses of the riverside from around 1980 on my ‘London’s Industrial Heritage’ web site: http://bit.ly/9xwCy9

    The brewery sounds rather more interesting than the visitor centre.

    Peter Marshall

    25 March, 2010 at 3:57 pm

  12. They might want to update their official website, now that’s it actually open.

    neilclasper

    30 March, 2010 at 2:57 pm

  13. Found this description on the architects’ website:

    http://sidellgibson.blogspot.com/2010/03/discover-greenwich-opening.html

    Peggy

    31 March, 2010 at 12:30 pm

  14. [...] 2 comments When I went to the Discover Greenwich exhibition launch earlier this year, my only real gripe was how the history of the eastern side of SE10 was [...]


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